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21 replies
Dining in the Dark?
bengy465
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ive always wanted to go to a dining in the dark p[lace. anyone been or heard of any in europe and know how much it is? i know paris has this one Dans le Noir anyone been?

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sammohanty
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Never been to one, heard on NPR on that restaurant..amazing..even the servers are blind besides being pitch black.
It will be interesting to see what your feelings were…

In Brugge, Belgium I have been to one which is not like Dans but more with only candles. In Bahamas they have something under the moonlit sky.

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I have done this in the museum in Arnhem, the netherlands, great experience!

see http://www.muzieum.n… (in dutch). You need to reserve it. Blind waiters will be there to serve you.

In paris, London, and Barcelona you have the Dans Le Noir restaurant.
http://www.danslenoi…

And here are some more dutch links for dining in the dark

http://www.kimbols.b…

cshrem
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I actually did this in Holon, Israel.
They have a restaraunt in the blind museum in Holon and it was really cool

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luv_the_beach
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Never heard of “dining in the dark”, so I Googled it. So, apparently, you eat in pitch black darkness and can’t see your food?

I really don’t see the appeal of this, but if this is available in your home country, Bengy, why would you go out of your way to find it in Europe?


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bengy465
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nvm i went to one in san francisco it was amazing i would have all my friends try it at least once ! great food and so much fun!. and i wanted to go to one in europe because i …just want to.lol

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luv_the_beach
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I’d be afraid of poking myself in the eye with my fork.


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bengy465
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it was really easy to eat and drink. they have a system to find your food and get your drinks kinda so it was pretty cool, all my friends thought this was a dumb idea but once you do it, it is really a great experience to try . My boyfriend and i really enjoyed ourselves.Smile

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The Herr
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bengy465 wrote:
it was really easy to eat and drink. they have a system to find your food and get your drinks kinda so it was pretty cool, all my friends thought this was a dumb idea but once you do it, it is really a great experience to try . My boyfriend and i really enjoyed ourselves.Smile

The Herr is sure y’all did…..in the dark!!!!

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Ads
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bengy465 wrote:
it was really easy to eat and drink. they have a system to find your food and get your drinks kinda so it was pretty cool

I have a system for that, lemme think what it is again……

oh yeah, it’s called Light.

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How about a restaurant called “Dining in the infernal racket”?

You could have hordes of American backpackers talking amongst themselves (which is generally 6dB louder than anyone else), constantly asking you “Is everything OK Here?”

Perhaps they could employ deaf people?
Just an idea…

paula_a
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WOW. This is one of my dream places. I’ve heard of these places but I never really have been to one. Frown

I hope one day I will be able to go to one! I love the idea of dining in the dark.

Being a bargain traveler has a lot of advantages Smile

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Oh well,

Dining on a different continent, with different food, and different culture, and different ingredients is never enough.

I assume the word “retarded” is easily translated.

Adski

jhnrbrts
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hope to get there one day Smile

luv_the_beach
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paula_a wrote:
WOW. This is one of my dream places.

Please tell me you’re kidding.

paula_a wrote:
I hope one day I will be able to go to one! I love the idea of dining in the dark.

Why don’t you just switch off the lights at home, and eat?

Honestly, this whole things sounds like such a rip-off, folks.

Europe is not America. Maybe there is a dining-in-the-dark restaurant in Europe somewhere, but Europe doesn’t really have many themed restaurants like America does: from ESPN and Disney restaurants to pirate-themed restaurants, restaurants that only serve Fruit Loops, to “rude” restaurants where the waiters are rude to patrons (because otherwise it’s unaccaptable, but if you pay for them to be rude, then it’s “fun”), to now dining-in-the-dark… The point of going out to Europeans is for the company, good food, and atmosphere…not some silly theme. Or as Ads pointed out, you’re in a foreign country….isn’t the different food/experience/architecture enough? This is exactly the reason why Americans are made fun of sometimes, and it perfectly illustrates how much there is in this world that we don’t even know we’re missing. Europe is not a big American subdivision with strip malls and tacky themed-restaurants!


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rob_co2
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I think it would be a neat experience- both dinning and learning, and a nice/legitimate way to be charitable to those who have to spend their entire lives eating that way. But I wouldn’t go out of my way to do it while in europe. Its not a european-specific type of experience.

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I think it would be a unique experience. Not being able to see, your other senses become enhanced, forcing you to smell, feel and truly taste what you are eating. Maybe something you never wanted to try before, or had once long ago and didn’t like then, now becomes something you enjoy. Simply because you can’t have a pre-conceived notion of what it tastes like if you can’t see it. Maybe that grilled cow tongue, raw fish eye, or sauteed goat intestine becomes your next favorite meal. And why not in Europe? There are thousands of dishes all over Europe that I can’t get here, part of the fun would be trying to guess what it is that you’re eating.

http://voices.washin…

http://travel.latime…

LTB, Just because you don’t like something, or the idea of it anyway, you immediately dismiss it. Not only that, but you use it to once again try and tell the world how great everything Europe is, and to put down Americans. Dining in the dark has it’s origins in Europe, so what are you going on about with “Europe is not a big American subdivision with strip malls and tacky themed-restaurants!” Only you could take this topic and turn it into a Europe vs. U.S. argument.

luv_the_beach
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Hi Clunker,

To answer your charges against me:

No I don’t think everything is better in Europe, although dining certainly is.

Anyone who disagrees has obviously never eaten at restaurant in Europe (not counting fast food or kebab joints).

Different people have different tastes, you’re absolutely right. But this is a travel website where inexperienced travelers seek travel advice and I will gladly give my opinion and educate people who have never [or barely] traveled abroad, and therefore don’t know what the they’re missing.

In Europe, you don’t wait for hours in the restaurant’s crowded lobby waiting for a table. The waiters don’t rush you out when you’re done eating so that they can sit new customers. And in Europe, you overlook a quaint street or square or waterfront when you’re eating, not some strip mall parking lot like at your local Applebee’s or Olive Garden.

All of which is very ironic given how much stronger the concept of customer service is in the United States than in Europe, yet paradoxically, Americans put up with being herded like cattle when they go out to eat, which epitomizes the several paradoxes in American society.

Thankfully, dining in architecturally-blessed Chicago [where I live] has become far more sophisticated and more similar to Europe in the past decade, with the exception of some tacky themed restaurants around Ontario/La Salle Streets that draw the uninformed suburban and tourist masses (this part of downtown Chicago is like the little-sister version of New York’s awful Times Square). The suburbanites and the visitors from Iowa can have their tacky Hard Rock Cafe, Rock McDonald’s, and Rainforest Cafe. We city folks can have the nice brick-oven outdoor restaurants in Lincoln Park all to ourselves.

And no, I don’t only “knock” Americans. If you had followed me throughout my time on Eurotrip [as well as the now-defunct Eurotrek] since 1999, you’d know that I “knock” everyone from Americans to…

1) Canadians, who are far worse on geographical knowledge than Americans [believe it or not], and for whatever reason constantly feel the need to remind everyone that Canada is in North America yet they always exclude Mexico from their distorted definition of “North America” (and yes Mexico is in North America)

2) Alcoholic Northern Europeans (specifically Brits and Nordics), who never fail to drink way too much and act like complete wackos when they’re abroad, doing things they’d never do back home (dancing in water fountains, smashing beer bottles in the streets of Benidorm or Corfu, and having sex in public in broad daylight), and then blaming the local bars for the fact they don’t know when to stop drinking

3 ) photo-happy Chinese and Japanese tourists who, for whatever reason, take pictures of every fuckin nook and cranny they encounter when they travel, and are actually more afraid than Americans/Canadians stray far from the tour bus

4) Australians, half of whom are really cool and easy-going, excellent travel buddies, while the other half are arrogant assholes that I want to punch in the face

5) and even how Southern Europeans drive horribly and just can’t seem to figure out how to form a proper queue at the bus stop or post office, and the concept of customer service is almost completely alien to them (although I will defend South Euros from the stupid and bogus stereotypes that you read here at eurotrip, like how they’ll supposedly grope you if you’re blonde or stare at you if you’re black…none of which is true in 2010. So to all you fat Plain Janes from Kansas with your tapered Walmart jeans…don’t worry, no one in Italy will give you a second look, no matter how blonde you are, when all the local girls are hot and half-naked)

But leave it to Americans to go above and beyond, by completely standing out in their quirkiness, and….unlike other nations….to absolutely refuse to poke fun at themselves or God forbid they take any criticism!

At least many Brits themselves will tell you how embarrassed they are by the way their compatriots act abroad, and South Euros are constantly self-critical about their lack of organizational skills, and Australians always poke fun at themselves, and so on. But Americans take all criticism as “anti-americanism”, then go on a bomb-sanction-destroy temper tantrum like an overgrown crybaby that acts far below its weight when it comes to political, diplomatic, and social maturity.

So, clunker, you go ahead, join your fellow Republicans/conservatives/tea baggers, go stick your heads in the sand as this country collapses under the weight of its bloated military and global empire (just as another superpower did 20 years ago), let alone the complete lack of social cohesion and a dysfunctional healthcare system that’s seen around the world as a good example of a healthcare system you do not want to emulate. Because everything in America is so whitewashed nowadays, we refuse to hear any bad news, and we’ve become a society based on sugarcoating and euphemisms. We go into seizures when we go to a fish market. meat market, or a restaurant in Europe or Asia and we see fish being sold/served with the heads still attached…because Americans think that fish sticks [let alone Big Macs, McNuggets, and Taco Bell chalupas] grow on trees all nicely wrapped like that. We’re involved in two wars, but our media only gives us pep-rally sanitized versions of what’s really going on (while people in Europe and Latin America see the images of dead bodies or limb-less Iraqi children when they watch the news at night). Fat women in America are called “average”, fat men are just “big guys”, and yet we’re dying from an obesity epidemic, and more and more American children are being diagnosed diabetes before finishing kindergarten.

I on the other hand, will continue to give sound travel advice, even if my delivery is controversial and upsets a lot of people…I’m not just going to confirm what people want to hear. Because when the original poster wastes all his time researching dining-in-the-dark restaurants and roller coasters in Europe, and then actually arrives in Europe, and sees Rome’s Piazza Navona…he’ll realize how silly he was for wasting all his research time looking up trivial things that he can easily find back home. Then he’ll come back home, and he’ll come across pictures of places like Eze (France) or Santorini (Greece) or Positano (Italy) or Cadaques (Spain) and he’ll wonder why those experienced folks at Eurotrip didn’t suggest those awesome places, and instead encouraged things that he can find back home, like dining-in-the-dark.

Thanks,

LTB


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ahhhh…. Just like the good old days!

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clunker
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LTB,

the fact is that I agree with much of what you say, but disagree with the venue in which you express your opinions. These are travel forums, and bengy465 posted a legitimate question. If you had actually tried it before, and then posted your response, fine. If someone asked where to get the best view of the Eiffel Tower, would it be fair if I responded that it’s nothing but a giant steel eyesore, and how idiotic not only that person is, but all of they’re countrymen as well for wanting to see it? (not my real opinion, btw)

No question you give some sound advice at times, but sometimes when someone asks a specific question, they’re looking for a how, which or when, not a why or why not based on your opinion.

Anyway, didn’t mean to rattle your cage

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I know someone went to Paris and had dinner at Dans le Noir, he says it was ok,

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Ah, the comfort and joy in the old Eurotrip! I haven’t visited this site in quite some time; it’s nice to see folks giving LTB a hard time! Keep rattling the cage, Clunker. No arguments on my end! It has to be a joint effort to keep the self-proclaimed most worldly of the worldly in his place. I can’t resist…

WTF, LTB? Why would the tines of your freakin’ fork be anywhere near your eyes whether eating in darkness or in light? I think it’s official…LTB can’t find his arse with both hands.

In all seriousness, the first time I ever heard of a dining in the dark experience had been on a little TV blurb showcasing a Dutch or Belgian restaurant. Although the experience isn’t the usual tourism draw, if one has time to incorporate an interesting dinner experience into the travel itinerary, why not? I think the experience has more to do with the use of your senses (minus your vision) rather than for the food. Notwithstanding, the food will most surely be impressive when compared to Uhmeriken grub.