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Don, those ultra-cheap European flights you often mention,
regancannon
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I’m embarrassed to say, but I’m having trouble finding one. I asked you a few weeks ago about the dos and don’ts of flying one-way into Schengen, and you said a 5-10 Euro departing flight to Baku or something would suffice. I’m not exactly sure where I should be searching for such flights though. I’m ready to book my SEA -> CDG ticket, so before I forget I’d also like to find something inexpensive that I can pretend I’ll be taking to leave the Schengen region. Any help you can offer?

I am leaving from Seattle with $13000 for 367 days
Reykjavik, Paris
Requesting help with Hostels, Nightlife, Food, Sights
Don
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Skyscanner.net. Put in your departure country “Everywhere” and choose a month, or entire year. For example, France to Everywhere entire year: http://www.skyscanne… Just change your departure city, country, and/or month to update it.

As far as one-way onward travel as proof for entry, I have used it myself, but your mileage may vary. If I was a bettin’ man, I’d bet you won’t have any hassles. But I’m not an immigration lawyer, nor do I pretend to offer legal advice; and I assume you’ll show up with a reasonable amount of tourist luggage and not looking or smelling like a vagabond—because those things could get you additional questioning at border entry.

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Ahhh perfect, thank you. Looks like there are lots of really cheap options.

I’ll be arriving showered, clean, with a reasonably well-outfitted backpack, proof of onward travel and proof of sufficient funds in my account, so…I’m assuming (and I know that’s a dangerous pastime, but I think it may be safe) that I’ll be let through.

Considering I’ll be flying Icelandair from Seattle to Reykjavik and doing their stay-for-a-week program, I’ll have to clear customs in Iceland, which is of course in Schengen. Will they treat my Iceland -> France trip as a “borderless” crossing? I haven’t heard from anyone on here who’s done it that way.

I am leaving from Seattle with $13000 for 367 days
Reykjavik, Paris
Requesting help with Hostels, Nightlife, Food, Sights
Don
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Since you will leave the airport in Iceland (and not just transit) then that will be your first entry into Schengen border. Your IS>FR trip should be “borderless” however, each member state reserves the right to reinstate border controls at any time. You will need a state (aka “country”)-issued picture ID to get a boarding card and board the flight, but that’s just to verify that you are the person named on the ticket.

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What is this Schengen stuff?

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Most of the countries in Europe are signers of the Schengen Agreement which means they basically are all one country in terms of passport checks, stay requirements, visa requirements. Once you enter the Schengen zone, you’ll have no passport checks or other formalities going from one country to another.

This is overly simplified, but the most important issue for most Americans going to Europe is the 90 day requirement. You can only stay within the Schengen zone for 90 days in any 180 period. When you land in a Schengen country the immigration agent might try to make sure you don’t intend to overstay the 90 day limit. Thus, a round trip ticket with return within 90 days or a ticket to a non-member country within 90 days is needed.

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Also, it’s complicated by countries that you’d think would be in the borderless Schengen Agreement…but in fact, they are not.

Anything in the UK is not Schengen. Bosnia Herzegovina, Serbia, Croatia, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania and Montenegro are not Schengen…so if you plan on getting to Greece, take a ferry or face a half dozen border checks. Many of the micro-countries are not Schengen (San Marino, Monaco, Andorra. Not sure about Vatican). Moldova, Ukraine and Belarus are out. Malta is in. Cyprus is out.

Confusing, eh? Though to be sure, it makes for much less complicated border exchanges in most of Western Europe. For a long-term traveler, the real issue is the “borderless” deal.

For those who aren’t familiar with it, I’ll explain in a nutshell: if you arrive in France, they don’t really give a crap so long as you show proof that you’ll be leaving the SCHENGEN ZONE within 90 days. What those folks at the airport will want is proof that within 90 days, you’ve got a flight OUT OF the Schengen zone—whether that be back to the US, Canada, or just across the Mediterranean to Algeria, it doesn’t matter. As long as you’ve bought the ticket. Additionally, it helps to have proof of sufficient bank funds to last you at least 90 days (that way they don’t get suspicious that you’ll go rogue within a week and try to hop on welfare). A work permit or green card could also prove that you’re arriving as an asset rather than a detriment, and it’ll likely get you through customs.

But if you arrive at the airport smelling like hell, looking like hell, with a one-way ticket into their homeland…be prepared to get sent right back, as they’ll assume you’re simply arriving to meld into their society and leech off their social programs.

I am leaving from Seattle with $13000 for 367 days
Reykjavik, Paris
Requesting help with Hostels, Nightlife, Food, Sights
regancannon
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Quick bump on this—is it common for the real “deals” to only appear within a month or two of departure? This is what I’m getting at the moment:

My flight out is March 31…so I’ll be clearing customs in Iceland on the 1st of April, and I’m assuming April flights OUT of Schengen shall appear in the next several weeks or something. Sound about right?

I am leaving from Seattle with $13000 for 367 days
Reykjavik, Paris
Requesting help with Hostels, Nightlife, Food, Sights
regancannon
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Whoops just realized my link didn’t paste.

http://i51.tinypic.c…

I am leaving from Seattle with $13000 for 367 days
Reykjavik, Paris
Requesting help with Hostels, Nightlife, Food, Sights
Don
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Not unusual during lower-demand times of year. I wouldn’t wait that long for summer, however.

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So two questions.

1. Does this mean you HAVE to have an exit ticket? (I’m having such a hard time finding correct info on EU tourist visas)

2. What happens if you get caught over staying your trip?

Thanks

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Carlynfry wrote:
So two questions.

1. Does this mean you HAVE to have an exit ticket? (I’m having such a hard time finding correct info on EU tourist visas)

2. What happens if you get caught over staying your trip?

Thanks

You must have proof of onward travel outside of that entire border within the allowed amount of tourist days. It could be a Eurostar ticket to London, a bus to Croatia, a cheap flight hop to Morocco, or a ferry to Albania — as examples. You need to have this on you at arrival time, not to be booked once you’re there.

EU has little to do with tourist border entries. The key words for most are UK and Schengen.

Overstay—assuming you get in—risks fine up to 2,000 EUR, immediate deportation of course at your own expense, and ban from re-entry. A big red X in your passport will gain you hours of fun and scrutiny at every single subsequent border crossing you try with that passport. Airlines might also ban you from flying them if they get swept up in it. They can get fined, too, and passengers agree to have all required visas and stay requirements before even boarding the flight.