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Fat Americans!
KiwiRob
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Hmm with burgers like this it’s not surprising.
 
[image]http://www.sonataspeed.com/djmatty/motivational/poster54193743.jpg[/image]

heavydrinker
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mod’s really packed on sum poundage

mb
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Since my state leads the nation in obiesity, I see people like that all the time unfortunately. 

Eat the food, use the wrong verbs, and end up getting charged double.

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I moved here from the skinniest state in the nation, Colorado, and it was a huge shock to see so many tubbies, especially children.
And now we have this:
Women’s Life Expectancy Drops in Some US Counties
Researchers blamed the decrease in women’s life expectancy on high blood pressure as well as chronic diseases related to smoking and obesity, such as lung cancer and diabetes.
I think a lot of this has to do with two things:
1) lack of education about nutrition
2) the prevalence of fast food.
When we moved to northwest Florida,the first town we lived in had a population of 5,000. There was one main street, and only a handful of restaurants, but one was a McDonald’s, another was a Burger King.
We’re in a more progressive environment these days, but still I see some really heavy people, and the saddest sight is the fat children.
With gasoline become more and more expensive, and the price of groceries rising so high, that combination might get more people out of their cars, and fewer people buying unwholesome convenience foods.

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Quote:
ORIGINAL: Cil
With gasoline become more and more expensive, and the price of groceries rising so high, that combination might get more people out of their cars, and fewer people buying unwholesome convenience foods.

 
Eating healthy is more expensive than fast food or un-nutritious food you get at the grocery store so I don’t see people changing eating habits for the better.

Eat the food, use the wrong verbs, and end up getting charged double.

Don
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One thing I’ve noticed, when I’m back in the States for visits, is just the prevelance and normality of going up to TGIFriday’s or Chili’s or Olive Garden, et. al. for lunches and dinners 2-3 times per week, if not more. I used to do that too, but it just never really hit me how many eateries are out there, and growing, and how much average Americans rely on them. It’s difficult to get decent food at any of them—most of it is crap. Ruby Tuesdays salad bar might be an exception.

I agree with the nutrition thing. It used to be that doctors were not required to take a nutrition class. Chefs probably know more about food chemistry and how food is used by the body, than GPs. And actually, I believe it’s chefs—culinary arts—that could actually redirect America’s love affair with cheap, fattening foods, into a healthier, tastier, more controlled lifestyle.

When you shop your ingredients yourself, you get re-acquainted with how foods are supposed to look and smell and what’s actually in—or not in—them. You can control salt and fat much better when you do your own cooking. When I pop a frozen pizza in the oven, I’m never really sure what exactly I’m getting; but when I make a whole grain bun with nice olive oil, puree fresh tomatoes, buy mozzarella balls to slice, fresh basil, and use paper-thin chorizo slices with fresh veggies on top… mmm… so much healthier, so much more fun to have friends over to help prepare with you, have a glass of wine while you’re making the food and talking… it’s just such a better experience vs. popping down to Cheddars and getting the gooey chicken pie with 200 grams of fat or whatever.

Buy healthy, eat color, use fresh raw ingredients, live happier and longer.

But I have to admit… That Chzbrgr does look good!

Cil
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: MB

Eating healthy is more expensive than fast food or un-nutritious food you get at the grocery store so I don’t see people changing eating habits for the better.

On the surface, it is more expensive.
But a bit of dietary education (and economics lessons) can go a long way.
Roasting my own $6 chicken, or making my own three or four buffalo burgers at $7 a pound, toss a green salad together and throw a few potatoes into the oven, and this really does not cost much more than a KFC or Burger King dinner.
I totally agree with Don about purchasing my own ingredients; unfortunately many people don’t know enough to care about this.
The higher cost of food is across the board—even the fast food places are raising their prices. People might educate themselves simply out of necessity.
I’ve always grown my own herbs and tomatoes and suchlike. Can’t grow my own wheat for flour, though.
With the high cost of wheat, this high fructose corn syrup thing seems more ridiculous than ever.
Does anyone know the ins and outs of our government subsidizing farmers who grown corn?

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Does anyone know the ins and outs of our government subsidizing farmers who grown corn?
  I think the subsidies kick in when the price of corn is at or below the cost of producing corn.  Right now, corn prices are high, so farmers probably aren’t getting a subsidy for producing corn — although there are lots of other payments and subsidies a farmer might be getting.

The ethanol fuel industry gets some big subsidies including big corporate income tax breaks (both federal and state, in corn producing states) and lower federal and state fuel tax rates. The 10% ethanol blend is about 14 cents cheaper than regular gas where I live, even though the cost of producing corn ethanol without the subsidies is about equal to the price of gasoline — so that 14 cents is coming from subsidies and is helping to drive up the price of corn as more and more ethanol blended gasoline is used.

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Thanks, oldlady.
What a convoluted mess.
It is described here “as a ‘perfect storm’ ofconditions driving prices up: surging demand for agricultural products as an alternative fuel source, the growing food needs of developing countries like China and India, higher transportation costs, droughts and floods.”