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101 replies
tdiddy
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anyway to get a job teaching english w/o a tefl certifcate? I’ve heard of some places, esp. China, that don’t care as long as you have a degree. Anywhere in Europe or elsewhere in the world?

onewayplease
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I am just getting out of high-school in June, and my friend and I are planning a trip to europe next summer. I am..or should I say my parents..are planning for me to go to school when I get back. I on the other hand want to find a decent job in europe…somewhere. Now, my question is, are there many good jobs for young canadian girls that are stable enough to support said cdn girls for a few years? or am I going to be bummin’ around? I know that in the summer we could work at a bar or somethin’ but what about in the "slow" season? or should I just wait until I’m totally through with school? I’m going to be taking nursing…hopefully. Your input is greatly appreciated…oh yeah, I guess I should mention that going to school in europe is not an option.

el viajero
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I’m not necessarily giving up a good job so much as a good life. I live in southern California, car is paid off, life good but I’m in love with a German girl and am moving to Freiburg, Germany on January 14th. I hope to study German with plans to learn how to be a translator and also work enough under the table to keep me afloat financially. Money isn’t as important to me as I thought as well, or it will be in a new way once I get there. I’m really excited, stressed, and anxious. My life has officially begun a direciton that has no real path and I’m out of my fucking mind, but my life is interesting right now, and that’s one of the best feelings I think. So, I have about 50 days left in America and then I’m out. Wish me luck and who is out there as a NON-EU citizen working in Germany, anyone???

Rache desMeersc...
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i’m a US citizen and I am working a "good" job in germany. I have bad days and good days but i don’t really feel like I was tapped with a magic wand when I came here and all my responsibilities went away. I guess if I was working in a hostel or having a more nomadic life, it would be like that, but I have a jobby job and if you live in the same place a couple of years it can be as monotonous or exciting as living in your own country—it really is up to you and your outlook on life.

there are crappy, monotonous corporate jobs in europe too, i think it’s just that the majority of expats don’t go into that sort of thing, so yo uget the impression that living in europe is like being on a permanent vacation.

chopper
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Its probably been said several times before on this thread but I think working in another country does get romantised. Having said that I think its only natural and as long as your desire is to travel and work abroad and not just boredom with routine then i side with everyone else and say go for it. If your just bored with routine maybe you should try something less dramatic an traumatic first!

I spent several months in europe this year and I made friends with 2 russian guys working in a hostel in paris an i can tell you they are far happier than most people i know or have met working well paid jobs.

mk031
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Um, yeah, I did this too, and didn’t get SHITE!!

el viajero
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I just wanted to respond to this again because I like being associated with this thread. 24 days and counting baby!

mad-doc
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This is such a great topic! It’s nice to know other people are as confused as I am. I’m a 29y/o girl who just finished my medical internship. After 10 years of continuous study (after high school), I felt truly burnt out – hence mad-doc. I even felt that I didn’t want to continue with medicine…considering the time and money my parents and I have invested in this, whoa. Anyway, I decided to go to Europe for a month to think things through (Oct-Nov) and it was the best trip I have taken. I went alone, had a look see at the potential for medical study abroad plus I got to think about what I was doing with my life. Don’s quote about "You’ll never be content where you are until you’re content with who you are", really touched a nerve. So I guess before I make any drastic decisions about moving anywhere, I should figure out what I really want.
P.S. I am going into psychiatry – an apt residency don’t you think??

draya
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Wow… i think is all i can manage to say about this topic! Last summer i packed in an ok job and went to germany for the summer, i lasted 2months before having to come home for personal reasons, anyway i got pulled back into the rat race and now have a brilliant job but i still have those itchy feet. The only problem is… i couldnt go on my own. i know it sounds so juvinile, people do it every day of the week. its not that i need someone to hold my hand or anything but starting on my own i wouldnt know where to begin. I need to get the hell out of Ireland before i go insane. All my friends and family think im mad giving up a brilliant job to go out into the unknown and bum around for god knows how long… but since i was knee high to a grass hopper all i ever wanted was to go fruit picking in the south of France or Waffle flipping in Belgium, Tulip pickin in the dam, living like a gypsie nearly, not knowing where to go next! Is it bizarre??

mk031
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draya, I don’t think it’s strange to have reservations about traveling by yourself, but it is the best way I know to build your own self-confidence and independence. It builds a daily reliance on your decision making, and shows you that you can do ANYTHING. It’s pretty ironic that you want to get out of Ireland, but I would do anything to get in there. I love changes (I think I have ADD), and traveling is such an overdose of change. So (and I’m in the same position), you’ve got a job you love, and I’m close to getting offered a job I know I would love, but is it worth it to take a year off or so and have the experience of your life by just packing up and going? And would you regret not doing something like that at 35 when you’re married with kids, and have absolutely no possibility of doing something like that in that position. I personally know that I don’t want to live with that regret, but I also don’t want to pass up a possible job opportunity that I might love. Anybody else thinking like this, or am I the only one?

draya
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ok well self reliance is one thing but to be honest im not very reliable…lol
i get what your saying about "is it worth it?" you see the job i have now is an ideal job, i honestly couldnt have gotten better but as you said will it be enough 15years down the line when its too late to do anything… ask yourself the same questions you asked me and the you’ll know if it’s worth doing or not.
And yeh Ireland is great but its the same as anywhere. Everyone wants to be somewhere they’re not from… its the same thing as All girls with curly hair want straight, all brunnettes want to be blonde… we are never happy with what we have but the difference is some people are happy to put up with what they have…CAN YOU?

mk031
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Um, yeah, I’m pretty sure I can "cope"…I’ve been doing that for a long time. I can make do my whole life, and have no experiences, and do the same 9-5 (well, 8-9, in my current situation) job thing, and sit in my little house…Some people are happy &quotutting up with what they have". That’s not me though. I don’t see the problem with breaking out of the mold once in a while.

bhays
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I just graduated last spring and Im currently working in Zagreb, Croatia. Many of these concerns went through my head before I decided to do this, but in the long run, a year, two or maybe 5 doesn’t really hurt. There will always be time to join the rat race back home.
I currently make roughly 10 times less than I would back home, but that doesnt really matter right now. I make enough to get by here, and you can’t beat being able to go explore a new country on the weekends.

mk031
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What kind of a job are you doing, just out of curiosity?

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Hi there – I’m 34 and am thinking about leaving my job to go live in Ireland – my mother is from Ireland so that makes be an Irish citizen (so I don’t have to worry about any permits or visas, etc)… I live in New York City an have an "ok" job that I’m not too crazy about… I have no wife or kids and no mortgage… the cost of living here is very high and the city can wear you down after living here for a few years… that and the threat of terroism attacks again is always in the back of my mind…

I’m hot and cold about making the move i.e. leaving a job (I do some accounting/bookkeeping) and having to look for one in a foreign land (I did spend my summers in Ireland as a child)… it seems that here in NYC people live to work and not work to live…

It really is a rat race here in the big city with nothing but concrete buildings all around and polluted air…

So – my advice to you guys still in your early 20s is to follow your heart – Mark Twain once said that it is the things you Don’t do in life that you will regret in 20 years – not the things you hav done…

bhays
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quote:
What kind of a job are you doing, just out of curiosity?

Im working as a web developer/graphic designer for a small internet cafe and web design studio.

jenn22
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Back in August I got the chance to go to Brazil on scholarship; i have always been interested in travel but this trip really put the desire even deeper. I am back home now, constantly trying to scheme new ideas to travel the world. I have only 1 1/2 years to finish my BA in Bus. Mgmt. and at this point, I am really not interested in school, but finishing I know could put me at a better advantage down the line. I am looking into TESL certifications and the such. Anyone have any advice to get through this next year—or to just do my own thing NOW??!!

bhays
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I’d finish school first while you’re on that track. Once you get away from it you will never finish. Besides, if you have a year and a half left, you should be able to find some study abroad adventures to get your travel fix…

nessa
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My fiance and I, 26 and 30 respectively, just bought our tickets to Europe yesterday. We are planning to stay 6 months. Ever since we realized we were really going it’s been like we were on vacation already. Our home and the county we live in seems alive and vibrant and I have started seeing this place through the eyes of a tourist. We live in Sonoma County near San Francisco and tons of people come to visit here each year, but when you live somewhere for 12 years it starts to drag you down.

Anyways we keep asking ourselves, "What if we don’t come back?"

Planning this trip has given us a new leash on life! His salary at the software company just got cut 15% the day before yesterday and you know what he did? He just laughed, because he’s got 6 more paychecks and we’re outta here! See ya!

Murlsy
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Hello everyone. I just joined this forum today. I am a techer of English as a Second Language in Texas. I am about to travel to Spain for the first time to explore which city I might enjoy taking TEFL classes in, or potential moving to. Does anyone know if this is a good idea right now with the lack of approval for the war? I heard there were many protestors in Barcelona and was just trying to get a vibe as to how I would be recieved. Madrid is the other city that I am dying to visit. Any must "sees"?

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I have another idea for college kids. Why not research where your degree is in demand in Europe and aim for an internship there? Certain industries like IT and Finance need qualified workers worldwide. You could make it known you eventually want a permanent job overseas when you graduate, and that way you’d have some form of stable income, which would make moving to a new country a lot less scary. I’m planning on using my degree, when I get it, to either get a job abroad or in a large company with offices abroad… so I can eventually transfer. I really admire people who just get up and go, but long term I don’t know how that would work unless you are very resilient… Europe has a completely different credit rating system than the US, so you’d have to rebuild that to ever make a major purchase like a house, and you do have to consider medical coverage. (I know, in some EU countries it’s free!. I’m not trying to discourage anyone… I plan on moving abroad before 30 myself. But I think a lot of research is definitely needed if you plan on staying ANYWHERE for the rest of your life, even in your home country… maybe a short term visit first to make sure.

Huginn
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I just quit as a stock broker to travel around europe from june to november. I am a 24 year old male.. economist but I was soo bored and been travelling before and I just love it. At the moment I am planning to travel solo but would like to find a companion.. thinking of working in between.. well my email is kaupsala@hotmail.com

eurobabs
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Hello everyone. I am the original author of this tread (Previous id was Hannahhope). I wrote this several years ago. I recently was doing a search and came across this tread still going, some 4 years later.

I am now 32 and living in Prague. I am working as an English teacher and am thoroughly loving it. I plan to stay here for a couple more years and then hopefully move on to Germany or Austria.

I am so excited to see so many people still replying to my topic. I hope that everyone else who has applied to this with the same thoughts are as happy and pleased with their decision as I am.

For those of you who are still contemplating the move – DI IT!!! You will not regret it.

Remember – "You would have not been given the desire to dream if you were not also given the ability to make it happen"

Barbara

Edited by – eurobabs on Mar 04 2003 06:42:44

krames
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Hi!

I noticed this thread and I thought I would throw my 2 cents in.

I studied abroad in Wales back in 1998 and I loved it! Upon my return I graduated from college and entered the "real world" as an IT Professional. I have been programming for the past five years and not a day goes by that I don’t think about working abroad.

I have attempted several times to find a job overseas. The best advice I have received so far, is to get a job with an international firm and hope for an international assignment. I tried this having briefly worked for Ericsson and that really didn’t get me very far!

I am now 28 and getting antsier by the day! I am hoping someone on this board can provide me better advice. What is the best way to land a job across the pond? I would prefer IT work, but I am not against manual labor if it gets me over there!

I remembered hearing that the UK had special visas for IT workers with 3+ years of experience, is this true? How is the economy in Europe?

I have also recently found a BUNAC program that could get me a 4 month work visa in Australia. Has anyone tried that? What are people’s thoughts on BUNAC? Australia?

Thanks for all the help! And please feel free to email me at krames@ieee.org.

Kyle

Edited by – krames on Apr 02 2003 17:56:37

Edited by – krames on Apr 02 2003 18:00:11

Stevie
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quote:It seems that those I talk to in their fifties and sixties regret little they have done, only what they haven’t done.

So true! I’m not moving just traveling for now but so many older people are telling me to go for as long as I can and encouraging me to work overseas. A lot of people have said to me that the one thing they regret is not working overseas. Really what’s a couple years in the grand scheme of things?

quote:I’d finish school first while you’re on that track. Once you get away from it you will never finish. Besides, if you have a year and a half left, you should be able to find some study abroad adventures to get your travel fix…

I also think that the overseas intership or study abroad programs are a great idea. I went to the US for a year in high school. I wish I had done it in university as well. But I can say I am so glad I got my degree out of the way – it would be very hard to go back after taking time off – but it can be done. You can always travel in your holidays so you are not totally stuck at home.

CaMaRoN
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I just dont believe the duration of this topic …

Since i was 5 my father told me … ´U have to go to Europe as a single man after u finish the university´ well i finished in December and now im in Spain (Girona, Cataluña) … since 16 i was saving money for this big trip … well i can live here for about 10 months without economical problems … but my trip its going to be longer (expect more than 1.5 year to 5 years … maybe never comeback). I left family, frineds, girlfriend, all !! and im not regret … maybe when i come back all my friends would be a ´good position engineers´ … so what ?? its only work and money, they will not know life the way im knowing it right now. I already make friends from Ireland (girlfriend), Lituania, Italy, Polony, Belgium .. so i already had a lot of new friends that already offer me some place to stay if im backpacking. Work … mmm all the people geto worried with that, my best advice its if you know spanish (im mexican so no problem for me) you can work with no problem in the richest region of Spain (cataluña) more in the coming season (summer) already a lot of job postings everywhere looking for people for summer campos and water parks all over the ´Costa Brava´. U even can find a job in Costa Dorada (Marbella) or Ibiza if you have good body and do weird things LOL. About IT jobs i dunno .. im looking for it but not putting the effort, i want first to work in something like waiter or barthender and then star my IT job search .. Any comments or want to sleep for a few in girona no prob. emmanuelsimancas@hotmail.com

DavidF
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British Work Permit Information:
If you are a U.S. citizen, it is virtually impossible to work in Britain, unless you are a college student/recent college graduate and can get a Work Permit through BUNAC (www.bunac.org.) That permit is good for 2 periods of up to 6 months each.

Citizens of Commonwealth countries (like Canada and Australia) can get a British "Working Holiday Visa" from the nearest British Consulate, but I understand that it is not a quick process.

If you have a grandparent who is/was British, you can get the little-known "U.K. Ancestral Visa" (also available after arriving in Britain, if you have the necessary paperwork proof with you) which allows you to work (and to stay in Britain for up to 4 years) but I don’t know if this visa is just restricted to citizens of Commonwealth countries like Canada, Australia and NZ.

Hope this helps!

David

quote:
I am a 28 yr old single female from the USA. I have a very nice job (make more than twice my age in income and have unlimited free 1st class travel all over the world) but am extremely unhappy with life. After I graduated from college I did a work abroad in London for 6 months and loved it. &lt>I do not have a clue as to what I want to do "career wise" in life, but love to travel so was wondering if I am absolutly crazy to want to give up my job(I have very little dept)and move to Europe and try to find casual work to figure out what I want.&lt>Also was thinking about the peace corps.&lt>Has anyone else out there been through this that can give me some advise.&lt>Would appreciate any help. Thanks <IMG SRC="http://www.eurotrip.com/bb/smile.gif">

Jeff Guidry
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An appeal to your patriotism:

Senator John McCain and President George Bush often speak about public service and try to encourage Americans to give some service to their country, and often mention the armed forces, Peace Corps and Americorps in the same breath. President Kennedy famously said "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." For those of us not interested in the military, the Peace Corps is a superb opportunity to live in another country for two years and help to serve your country and the citizens of another country. This is an option I have been exploring and will likely serve in the Peace Corps in two years after I have finished my commitment to pay off my student loan.

I am 31 going on 32 and I am seriously re-evaluating my life right now. I sort of fell into my career as a broadcast operator for Directv, and it has been many years since I have felt any desire to do my job. I took a trip to Amsterdam and Paris last year (my first trip abroad) and it really took me on a journey since I got back to discover myself and re-assess where I am and where I am going. I feel that living abroad as a volunteer would satisfy both my desire to live and work abroad and give me a chance to give of myself rather than working only for my own needs.

Any thoughts on volunteering?

DavidF
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Hi Kyle:
Please see my posting on this board re getting British Work Permits.

David

quote:
Hi!

I noticed this thread and I thought I would throw my 2 cents in.

I studied abroad in Wales back in 1998 and I loved it! Upon my return I graduated from college and entered the "real world" as an IT Professional. I have been programming for the past five years and not a day goes by that I don’t think about working abroad.

I have attempted several times to find a job overseas. The best advice I have received so far, is to get a job with an international firm and hope for an international assignment. I tried this having briefly worked for Ericsson and that really didn’t get me very far!

I am now 28 and getting antsier by the day! I am hoping someone on this board can provide me better advice. What is the best way to land a job across the pond? I would prefer IT work, but I am not against manual labor if it gets me over there!

I remembered hearing that the UK had special visas for IT workers with 3+ years of experience, is this true? How is the economy in Europe?

I have also recently found a BUNAC program that could get me a 4 month work visa in Australia. Has anyone tried that? What are people’s thoughts on BUNAC? Australia?

Thanks for all the help! And please feel free to email me at krames@ieee.org.

Kyle

Edited by – krames on Apr 02 2003 17:56:37

Edited by – krames on Apr 02 2003 18:00:11

krames
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Hey Jeff,

I feel your pain! (you can read my story above) Myself, I have been vacillating between working abroad and learning a langauge overseas. I briefly looked into volunteering, but I became soured on the idea after I found companies that actually CHARGE you to volunteer.

I have found a couple books that might be of interest to you. I bought this book a couple of months ago and its an excellent resource on working abroad, studying abroad, and volunteering.
http://www.amazon.co…

I havent looked at these, but they seem to come up a lot!

http://www.amazon.co…
http://www.amazon.co…

Good luck!

Jeff Guidry
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Thanks for your suggestions Kyle. I’ll take a look at that information.

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Hello Fellow Travellers —

I did it! WOW! So many thoughts are going through my mind right now. Some are wonderfully optimistic and some are horribly pessimistic.

I quite my job recently. Everything was great – the money, the coworkers, the company – but it was not a business I wanted to stay in for a lifelong career. So, I quit and I am going to make something happen.

I am moving to Spain for 3 months (Oct-Dec) to refresh my spanish. Then I will come back to the United States and get another BA degree, then a master’s, and then a job.

I am excited and nervous. I love Spain and cannot wait to get there.

Thank for listening. Hope I could help inspire someone out there.

Happy Trails!
Rick

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Hannah/Eurobabs,

I just found this posting and as I was reading it kept hoping you would provide an update of your decision. I am very happy for you! Good to hear you are loving it.

I am not exactly in the same situations as others in that I don’t have the option or real desire to live abroad for long periods of time. Reading this thread has helped me see that I actually like my job and work and especially like that I have been at my company long enough to receive over four weeks paid vacation a year and that every year I will keep receiving more vacation time up to the 6 weeks paid vacation it tops out at.

So long story short I am planning my first Europe trip for this summer and plan on going somewhere every year for up to four weeks at a time. Not living abroad but hopefully getting an opportunity to experience the idea for a tiny bit of time.

Congrats again to all those making their decisions and enjoying their lives. It really is nice to hear.

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Knic,
I am still in Prague and still teaching. Although I am not really enjoying the teaching (1 year is enough of that) it keeps me here in Europe leagally working. I am planning on moving to Germany this summer. Will take a month long German course in Munich (anyone have any suggestions!!!) and trying to find out how to get a business license while I am there so I can work there this fall.

Am glad that you are going to Europe. About the vacation though, most European countries START their employees out at 4 weeks and by 5 years, you usually have 6 weeks or more. And here, it is not uncommon (and quite acceptable in companies) to actually take an entire month off, where as in the states, it is EXTREMELY difficult to get an entire month off at one time. But if you can do it, good luck.

Good luck in what ever you do and remember Remember – "You would have not been given the desire to dream if you were not also given the ability to make it happen"

Barbara

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Hi there,

I just read this thread and I just can’t believe how many people feel the same way as I do. I’m only 25 but have a good job in a great company. I’ve been with this company for 2 years and would be a company that I’d like to stay for a while. The only thing holding me back is the fact that I went backpacking to Europe for a month last summer and fell in love with Europe! I was born in Canada and have lived there all my life so the idea of living/being in another country is just tooo tempting. I love the European culture, the streets, the cars, the houses, the language and of course the language. I have dual citizenship (British/Canadian) so it is a little easier for me to find a job. That’s not the problem. The problem I have is that I would like to find a job while I’m still in Canada so that I can just quit my job here and pack my bags and go. I don’t really like the idea of quitting my job and moving over to London with no job. What if I don’t get a job? or the company sucks? I just don’t want to be unemployed for too long. It looks like though that the agencies really like to meet you face-to-face for an interview which I can understand so I’m thinking of taking a week off work to go over there for interviews (assuming I’ll get them). What kind of jobs do people on this board have when they move over to Europe? Do they line up a job first in their hometown or move over there and look for one?

Also, apart of me is scared about moving over since I’m going to pretty much a new place and try and pick up my life. I don’t have any friends over there and am scared about the transition.

Would appreciate any help or advice. Thanks Smile

DavidF
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Babygirl:
I grew up in S.E. England (and make quite frequent trips back there), but now I run my own company in the U.S.: here’s my advice, both as a business owner and as someone who used to work in England (as an employee):

The best way to get a job in Britain is definitely to go there for a week (longer would be better), buy up all the local (not national) newspapers conyaining job ads., and apply to all the job agencies. (When they hear your Canadian accent, it’s very important to emphasize your British citizenship.)

Definitely consider working outside of London – less pay, but way cheaper cost of living (even in towns only about an hour from London) – especially the rents.

Also get a cheap British mobile phone, so employers can contact you. If you can’t put a British phone contact number on the job application form, employers won’t be interested in you. (A mobile phone number is fine – many Brits have given up their expensive residential phone lines completely.) And if you have a friend or relative in Britain, ask to use their street address as your British address – job application forms showing a British street address work much better!

As you’re not a resident, you can only get a British mobile phone which uses the pre-paid cards (Virgin shops have the cheapest phones, but they only work in Britain, not in the rest of Europe) But you’ll need the phone anyway if you get a job!

If you don’t have any friends or relatives in Britain, here’s another idea: apply for a temporary house-sitting position in south-east England (which is where most of the jobs are), ie. you look after a house while the owners of the house are away. (Try www.housecarers.com.) Then while you’re house-sitting, you have a legitimate British street address and a British home phone number. (Just be sure not to get stuck in some village with no public transportation.)

In 2001, I had 2 BUNAC students stay at my house outside of London (now sold). They appreciated the fact that it made it much easier for them to get jobs with the legitimate British street address and residential telephone number that they had while housesitting. Then that winter another house-sitter for me (from NZ) did the same thing – and she’s still working in England. (This really works!)

Basically the same procedure would apply to Ireland, but with your British citizenship I would start in Britain.

If you’d like more detailed info, on this, send me an e-mail:
<dlflurrie@yahoo.com>

ErikaH
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I’ve so enjoyed reading this thread, especially the progress of the original poster. I was on my own and had an exchange student living with me when I was 18 in high school. After I graduated I spent 5 weeks in Europe. I met some really cool people and had a blast. After returning to the US, I had a renewed sense of confidence and a hunger for adventure. I moved to a bigger city and partied some more. When that got old, I decided I needed a change. I got in touch with some of the friends I made in Europe who said I could stay with them until I got on my feet. At 19 years old, I landed in France with no money and no job. I only spoke English, and had no college education, but I assumed I’d find a job in a bar or teaching English. Boy was I wrong. It took me about a year to learn French. I met and fell in love with a French guy. We had a son. Only at that point was I able to go throught he extensive process of obtaining a working visa. I finally found a job as a waitress for minimum wage. Later I taught English privately and worked as a daytime nanny. Eventually I got bored with it and wanted a more satisfying career. So after 4 years in France, I returned to the US to get an education. I’ve got my Bachelor’s degree now, a new husband and 3 kids. The college education had little to do with my career choice since I’m a body artist, but it helped with making me mature enough to start my own business. Now I’m heading back to Europe for a few weeks every summer to teach henna classes and to attend the World Body Painting Fesival. I’ve got the best of both worlds and best of all, "Je suis bien dans ma peau." I feel good about who I am. Maybe we’ll move to Europe one day…or maybe not. We’ve got good friends around the world and I’d never regret any of my experiences.

Carpe diem!

Erika

greatescapist
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hello all. good topic.
however, i’m amazed at the wealth — sheer wealth — that exists among these very young posters! earning more than twice her age at 28? a homeowner at 24??!! am i missing some big secret to earning the big bucks, or what!? jeez…

hope that doesn’t sound bitchy. i’m just truly amazed…college educated, experienced, talented, 36, poor…and AMAZED.

in other words, all of you need to just go for it! you obviously have incredible financial resources to fall back on — so just DO IT!
best wishes

AndrewBoom
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Comedy show Boom Chicago is usually looking for promoters in Amsterdam. It’s a lot of fun, and they are great people. It’s not, however, exactly the "real job" that makes parents happy. See www.boomchicago.nl

Andrew

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Everyone that has had a favorable time abroad feels the same way you do about going and doing more. Although there are many benefits of having a good paying and solid job in this bad economy, when we travel, we realize the everyday "necessities" somehow seem a bit materialistic and unnecessary.

I taught English in China and earned $120/month and it was probably the least stressful time of my life. A true sign that money doesn’t buy everything. I returned with no debt, perhaps a smaller apartment and used car than my corporate friends, but memories and experiences that were and are priceless.

I love traveling around the globe, but I do feel like doing ‘projects’ and having a task somewhere (perhaps that is the "American" in me) makes it a more worthwhile trip for some reason. You become part of a community and you get to share your skills to others, while learning tenfold from them.

Peace Corps is a good option, although it’s a 2 years commitment and the paperwork is pretty intense. Cultural Embrace is another worthwhile one to check out that is fee based, but reasonable and a helpful resource. Good luck!

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Well count me in as one of the masses looking to expand my horizons. 33 yrs old, working at a Fortune 500 company, making a 6 figure salary and looking for a change. Most of my friends think im crazy. They don’t understand why I would want to change that, they have been working to get where I am, so they can get married, buy a house, have kids…etc…I try to explain that is not what I want right now. Some have started to get it, but sometimes I second guess myself. Do I really want to throw it all away? what exactly am I "throwing away"? A good job? There are many of those out there and in the end, its just a job.

Being a US citizen does not give one many options thought. If I did have a EU passport or did know someone oversees that I could stay with for a while I think I would be there already. But starting fresh in a new country where I know nobody, not knowing know if I will be allowed to work let alone find work, not knowing the language, etc…is pretty daunting.

Im on the fence….anyone want to push me? Smile

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Whats the worst that could happen? I say go for it!! Can always go back as long as you leave the current company on good terms.

The things you will regret most in life are the risks you didnt take.

Take the road less traveled!!

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Is your Fortune 500 company a worldwide company…can you take a position at a division or office over there? If not that company, there are so many big companies with positions in Europe….these options would allow you to keep the 401K, benefits, and salary but moving abroad too. But at the end of the day the biggest regret in life is not living one. Follow your heart and go for it. The only person you have to be loyal to is yourself and not your job (plus as a generalization, how loyal are companies to employees anymore?).

Make it happen. And best wishes.

arolf
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It’s always nice to know that there are others out there in the same boat. I’m 26 year old single female from Canada with a fairly comfortable job for a large firm. I taught English in Japan 4 years ago and I haven’t stopped dreaming of travel since my return.

Although I would love to settle down, have my own place, etc. I am not sure what I’d like to do career wise. So, in the meantime I am looking into working abroad. My plan is to quit in September, work in Japan once more (I have a wedding to attend also) for a few months and then hit Europe for an undetermined amount of time.

I’ve been thinking of travelling for ages but the lack of security has always held me back but now that I’ve made up my decision all I need to do is wait for my set date and I’m off.

If anyone knows of a good job opportunity I would love to discuss it. I’ve looked into everything from real work to temp work, picking grapes in France, working in Organic Farms in Italy, being an Au Pair … I’ve even taken a bartending course to prep myself for the excursion, just in case.

Anyhow, best of luck in all your endeavors and I look forward to any and all repsonses.

Cheers,

Stryfe
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see im 18 and i live in canada. i have no attachments here stopping me from travelling abroad. i really want to find a place where i could move for a few years. my questions are…

A) What do I need besides a working visa to work in other european countries?

B) Where is the best place to go in search for work?

C) Is there any other jobs besides being an english teacher for someone my age?

D) Where is the easiest place to find a job?

Thanks ahead of time, and any input would be much appreciated. Thanks again.

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do it…………follow your heart, especially if you are young, its an experience you will never forget, i have done it, i live in miami now, but before i live in Trinidad , i travel all over and every year i make sure i carry the family to eroupe, now i am settle, i keep telling my self it worth it……….itally,france,berlin,switzeland,spain,barbados,st.lucia,grenada,jamaica,mexico you name it i have been there, now i want to travel to japan and all these asian countries…..so good luck…

secretam
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I’m so glad I found this thread!

In fact, I create a Yahoo group for people who’d like to continue this discussion and keep in touch in a more consistent fashion.

I’m in my early 30s, American, and close to dropping my life here in the states and starting anew in Europe. I hope my thoughts and experiences, as well as those of others, can serve as support and encouragement for those thinking about doing the same.

http://groups.yahoo….

natashaz
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I am in the same position you are.

I’ve been at my job for the past two years, and it has been a very successful two years… however… it’s just not who I am.

You can bounce back from anything but death. I’m saving up for a year ( hopefully more ) away, and until then I’m going to just sample as much of the world in smaller portions as my vacation time will allow.

Best of luck to you and everyone else in the same boat,

Nz

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I am soo glad to find this board!! So anyone reading these is probably bored with hearing the same types of life stories.. but here is mine ( although identical to many others). I am a broadcast journalism student in FL, and traveled to Europe this past summer. I miss it every day. Now, I am in the beginning stages of packing up and leaving to work on a work visa for 6 months( then apply for an extension, hehe). I plan to start in London. I couldn’t get enough of this city. I am taking the LSATS ( as my plan has been to go to law school), mostly to appease my family. The plan I am telling them is that I will be back in a year to start law school.
anyway, I am mostly posting for anyone with reservations about leaving to take time in Europe. I have thought about this for what seems like forever. This is my conclusion: I don’t want to go to my 10 year high school reunion and spill my life story to old peers, only for it to be identical to theirs. I was thinking: how many people are going to explain that they went to college, got a job and are now waiting on that "big promotion"? EVERYONE. I am my own master, and this is my chance to create a very different story. Everything in me wants to do what I have been trained to know is the wrong and unsmart decision. I want to travel and "bum around" Europe, as a ( gasp) waitress!! Whatever it takes! THIS is living! Seeing this big huge world and experiencing all of the amazing people in it is what I think life is all about! And, when I go to my high school reunion, I can tell tales of the seven countries I lived in and all the amazing things and places I saw.. all because I took the road less traveled.
Anyway.. I’m babbeling….
-Manda

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I have the same desire to travel extensively in europe. The difference is I am a single mom with a 6 yo daughter. Has anyone here just packed and left with a child in tow? I feel travel would be very educational for both of us.
Thanks.