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13 replies
the legal way to get a job
Don
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As a foreign employee and employer in Europe…
Here’s a quick summary of what you’ll need to do for legal work in Europe —

1. Get a job offer from employer in country. Employer must attest that job has either a.)already been offered to nationals, then EU citz, or b.)that the skills are so specialised that you are the only possible candidate to fill the position.

2. Application + fee for first-time work and residence to said country’s immigration authority. You will need to also send a copy of your lease stating monthly rent amounts.

3. Wait 2-3 (4?) months for a reply.

4. If approved, go, register in the country. Usually get a work permit stamp in your passport.

5. National registry number usually comes within first month. ‘Til then, you’ll have a hard time setting up phone and internet and a bank account.

6. Your company sets you up for tax and benefits withholding and withholds this from your pay.

7. Generally have to renew every year (application + fee).

8. This type work permit generally limited to 4 years maximum.

All of this assumes language proficiency. If none, then you’ll need to pay for intensive language lessons upon arrival, unless the employer wants to spring for 8+ weeks at 20 hours/week.

Some of this may be specific to Norway (my situation) but as I speak with co-workers throughout Europe, it is surprisingly similar—at least for Schengen Agreement countries.

Note that tax almost always must be paid—it is very difficult to evade with the numerous tax treaties between countries (USA, etc.).

frihed89
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Hi Don, You stayed? Meet a woman? If you ever get to Copenhagen, contact me at famcallaway at mail.tele.dk.

Don
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I did stay… it’s been almost 4 years now. In fact, my next job will likely be in Copenhagen. Finding an apt., then getting our company registered will be first and foremost.

One thing that should make the move a bit easier is that I read Norwegian fairly well, so reading Danish shouldn’t be too difficult. Pronouncing Danish… well, that’s going to take some time.

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Great. Look me up when you come to town. It’s hard to find long-term rental digs in Copenhagen, by the way. Owner-housing has gone through the roof. Be prepared for a shock, unless Norway is the same way.

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how can you have a lease if you don’t have a paying job yet? seems like a catch 22…

I am traveling for 51 days
Bath, Haltwhistle, London, Füssen, Freiburg, Stuttgart, Speyer, Nördlingen, Salzburg, Hallstatt, Salzburg, Rome, Ostia Antica, Athens, Delphi, Athens
Don
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I agree, Feicht. The idea, I think, is designed as a deterrent to applicants who haven’t planned or thought ahead, and/or have family, friends, or work providing a sufficient support network upon arrival. Without this, you need to prove 80,000 NOK in the bank per 1 year oppholdstillatelse (residence permit). At current rates, this is about $12,000 USD.

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so i take it that you can’t just show up there and start working then? what if you wanted to immigrate? does it work the same way?

I am traveling for 51 days
Bath, Haltwhistle, London, Füssen, Freiburg, Stuttgart, Speyer, Nördlingen, Salzburg, Hallstatt, Salzburg, Rome, Ostia Antica, Athens, Delphi, Athens
Don
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quote:so i take it that you can’t just show up there and start working then?
Not legally (or easily), no.

quote:what if you wanted to immigrate? does it work the same way?
On what basis would you apply for citizenship? Parents? Refugee status from a UN-recognized refugee country? Family reunification (marrying a citizen)? Work history in country? Not trying to be difficult—just a reality check.

The easiest would be if one or both parents are citizens of the country you wish to apply for citizenship. In Norway, this must be done before your 23rd birthday, and even then it ain’t a cakewalk.

Only about 10% of UN refugees that Norway takes in receive resettlement visas. There is a high burden of proof for the applicant to show why settlement should be granted. After 7 (?) years resettlement visa, UN refugees can then apply for citizenship—if they have no police record, history of employment, language proficiency, and taxes paid up.

Feicht
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quote:

quote:what if you wanted to immigrate? does it work the same way?
On what basis would you apply for citizenship? Parents? Refugee status from a UN-recognized refugee country? Family reunification (marrying a citizen)? Work history in country? Not trying to be difficult—just a reality check.

i dunno, i was just curious

I am traveling for 51 days
Bath, Haltwhistle, London, Füssen, Freiburg, Stuttgart, Speyer, Nördlingen, Salzburg, Hallstatt, Salzburg, Rome, Ostia Antica, Athens, Delphi, Athens
Don
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oh.

Feicht
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so i guess it’s not like the US then, where it’s easy as hell to get here illegally and get a job and never ever get deported?

but then again, i guess if you’re going the LEGAL route, the US is kinda hard too… i had a friend who was british, and had lived here with her family for like 20 years or something… her dad was a college professor and they owned a house, etc etc etc… but as far as i know they kept getting denied US citizenship…

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Kaylya
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I’ve got a friend with a similar situation with regards to US immigration. Canadian citizens, father’s got a PhD and a well paying job.

Now that my friend is 21 and not covered under his father’s green card or whatever, he’s just a "visitor" when he goes to see his parents (he is attending university in Canada but lived in the US for most of his formative years, 10-15 years)

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quote:
I’ve got a friend with a similar situation with regards to US immigration. Canadian citizens, father’s got a PhD and a well paying job.

Now that my friend is 21 and not covered under his father’s green card or whatever, he’s just a "visitor" when he goes to see his parents (he is attending university in Canada but lived in the US for most of his formative years, 10-15 years)

yeah it’s really weird… and BS, in my opinion. i really don’t see what the big deal is about letting people become US citizens. afterall, this is the land of the immigrants, right? i mean, i can see denying people who just want a handout, but come on! denying &quotrofessional" people? please…..

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jac
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Hmm…I think my post didn’t work so if this is up twice sorry!

Those of you who are Canadians and a student (or just graduating) the swap program is a way to get a work visa and work legally. You have to pay them to get the visa for you (which is a little high) and the possible countries are a bit limited. Nonetheless, if looking for a way to get a visa and work for a short period it is an option.