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Schengen Visa questions
forant
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I’m in the midst of trying to purchase my tickets for my fall trip to Europe. I’m going to be in a study abroad program for ten weeks. I plan on traveling for a few days before the program, and a few weeks after. Generally, I’m wondering how strict the EU is about the Schengen Visa.

If I overstay my visa by two or three days, will anything happen to me? Has anyone experienced anything similar to this? I will be leaving from CDG.

Second, if one leaves the Schengen area to go to, say, Morocco, which days count towards the number of days allotted by the visa, and which don’t? If I left for Morocco on the 18th and arrived on the 18th, was in Morocco all of the 19th and 20th, and then left Morocco on the 21st and arrived back in Schengen territory on the 21st, would that count as 2 or 4 days out of the area?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Don
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Quote:
…I’m wondering how strict the EU is about the Schengen Visa.
Be aware that all of EU is not part of Schengen Border. In addition to the 90 tourist days you get upon first entry to the Schengen Border zone, you can also get 180 days to play tourist in UK and Ireland, 90 days each in Switzerland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Baltics, and the newest EU member states.

Time out of Schengen Border is calculated by your departure date stamp and your re-entry date (so, 2 days in the example you gave). As you probably already know, you can’t leave for a day and come right back with a fresh 90 days—it doesn’t work that way. It’s 90 in/ 90 out, but as you described, as long as you are stamped in passport when leaving Schengen, those days don’t count against you if you soon return (as long as you’re not at or near the 90 limit in the first place).

Be careful about counting your days—especially if you ever want to come back, and if you don’t want to risk a fine.

What’s your proof of onward travel when you first enter Schengen? Will that be a one-way ticket to Morocco?

forant
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I will have a roundtrip ticket into Rome and out of Paris.  Similarly, I will have a round trip to and from Morocco.  Is that sufficient?
 
Also, the study abroad office at my college is telling me we don’t need a Schengen visa unless we’re traveling more than 90 days.  That’s wrong, right?  I need a Schengen visa for any entry into a Schengen country – at least that’s the impression I’m under.
 
Essentially, I’m planning on 94 days.  The Schengen visa provides 90 days.  I will be out of the area for four days – not a problem.  Is there any issue with my plans?

Don
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There should not be a problem based on the scenario you describe—as long as you have passport from a Schengen border visa waiver country (US, Canada, Australia, NZ). This means that no additional paperwork is required as long as your visit is primarily for tourist activities, and within the allowed days. At first entry to Schengen, your passport will be stamped. This serves as your tourist visa during your stay.

forant
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: Don

There should not be a problem based on the scenario you describe—as long as you have passport from a Schengen border visa waiver country (US, Canada, Australia, NZ). This means that no additional paperwork is required as long as your visit is primarily for tourist activities, and within the allowed days. At first entry to Schengen, your passport will be stamped. This serves as your tourist visa during your stay.


Yes, I do have such a passport. So when I arrive, I will simply get a stamp and that’s it? No need to apply for anything? Also, is there any way to extend such a visa to cover the extra few days I could possibly be in the area? Say I didn’t go to Morocco or London, I’m in the Schengen area for 94 days now. Will they care if I am? How strict are they on 90 day enforcement?

Don
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If your primary reason for visit is touristic, and you will be staying 90 days or less, then you do NOT need to arrange any paperwork. If you’re planning to stay more than 90 continuous, you are supposed to pre-arrange an extended tourist visa ahead of time—in hand when you check in for your first flight leg, because the airline is partly responsible if you don’t fulfill entry requirements and get denied entry.

If your primary reason for visiting is to study, then you are supposed to pre-arrange a study visa and have it in-hand before boarding your first flight. If you’re not arriving with loads of books and/or more than 3 big suitcases, and your intent is to spend less than 20 hours per week in a non-paid study position, then your reason for visit could be deemed tourist. You probably wouldn’t have any problems entering. However, when you exit Schengen, they could notice you’re over 90 days, then you face a fine and ban from re-entry for 2 years. Plus, you’ll probably miss your flight that day, meaning you’ll have to re-book at walk-up fare levels.

Realistically, if you’re dressed like a tourist, have 1 big suitcase plus your carryon, and (just keepin it real) if you’re light-skinned, then you probably won’t have any problems at all.

forant
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dressed as a tourist, with one big suitcase, and i’m a few days over 90? will they notice? furthermore, will they care?

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i think it depend on lot of factor. i am ALBANIAN and once when i overstay visa in REPUBLICA ITALIA i locked in cage on boat and fed small amount of meat sent back to LAND OF BLACK EAGLE

Don
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Forant, you’re killin me.

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ORIGINAL: forant
dressed as a tourist, with one big suitcase, and i’m a few days over 90? will they notice? furthermore, will they care?


Good luck with whatever risks you choose to take.

Kasper57
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I cant seem to make sense of any of that above, I hold a Canadian passport and plan on spending only 6 weeks backpacking around europe.  Hitting up atleast 6 Schengen countries if not more.  Do I need to bother getting a Schengen Visa?

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No. Canadians (and USA, Australia, NZ) get 90 days to play tourist in the combined Schengen border zone countries. Not per country; combined. Not leave 1 day and come back with a fresh 90; 90 in/ 90 out.

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ORIGINAL: Don

At first entry to Schengen, your passport will be stamped. This serves as your tourist visa during your stay.

 
Heh, just make sure they ACTUALLY stamp it. I got rushed through the lines at CDG and BCN airports and none of the lazy fuckers stamped my passport, of course I didnt notice…. not until i tried to walk into poland from germany and nearly got arrested for espionage or christ knows what…

I am traveling for 51 days
Bath, Haltwhistle, London, Füssen, Freiburg, Stuttgart, Speyer, Nördlingen, Salzburg, Hallstatt, Salzburg, Rome, Ostia Antica, Athens, Delphi, Athens
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UMMMMMM….10 weeks study abroad program =70 days.  That only gives you 20 legal days back in which to party.
 
My advice: don’t attend classes for the 70 days.  Have fun, instead.  When you get home, tell your parents you have met a 35 year-old Italian widow (if your parents are Protestants, Swedish, if they are Catholic) with three children and want to marry her.  They will forget about the school-related issues.
 
Life is too short to obey the rules.